The ROI Revolution Blog

6 Tools You Can Use to Troubleshoot Google Analytics Yourself

April 17, 2009

It's nice to be able to find the tools you need when you need them. It's true for farmers and it's true for web analysts. Even if you aren't a web analyst, you have access to a lot of great tools on the web that can help you figure out if Google Analytics is working properly on your site. While my last article focused on tools you can use to get the most out of the reports in Google Analytics, this article is more for those of you that want to make sure that the data is right before it even gets there. shovels-ready.jpg

Bury your Google Analytics problems.

Read on for a list of 6 tools that you can use to find out for yourself what's going on with Google Analytics.

#1. Firefox

First and foremost, I need to mention Firefox. While it is important to test your Google Analytics implementation across multiple browsers, Firefox offers the most flexibility when it comes to viewing source code and using helpful add-ons. Since some of the other tools I'll talk about are Firefox add-ons, I thought I should mention it first. For basic debugging, you can't beat it. fire-fox.jpg

A fox on fire.

To give you a quick example, here's a side-by-side comparison of the source code viewer for both Firefox and IE7. Keep in mind that the search feature (or Find) is much better for Firefox as well:
firefox-source.jpg ie-source.jpg

Left: Firefox - Right:The Big Ugly (IE).

So even just finding the Google Analytics code is easier in Firefox. I'd say that's a major plus. Of course, the majority of Internet users still use Internet Explorer and there is a sizable Mac community, so I'll be sure to mention if there are alternatives to the below tools that you can use in IE and other browsers.

#2. Firebug (and Firebug Lite)

fire-mantis.jpg

A bug on fire.

Firebug is a great all-around tool that you can use to do many things, from viewing and changing source code to seeing the cookies for any given site (see #3). With it, you can:
  • Easily see all scripts that the page is loading (like ga.js or urchin.js).
  • View all links, forms, and downloads that contain custom pageviews or event tracking.
  • Test the Google Analytics linking functions by changing the source code on the page.
  • View the DOM and all objects that you can use to your advantage when installing Google Analytics.
  • View Cookies with the help of Firecookie (#3), and use the Net tab to get a feel for page load times.
firebug.jpg

Firebug appears as a little bug icon in your status bar. You can see the various tabs that you can use to debug websites on the fly.

I'm sure I'm missing a few things here, but Firebug is really, really useful - here's a look at some of the functionality it gives you:
firebug-console.png

See how Google Analytics cookies change.

firebug-html.png

Check event and onclick code and change it on the fly.

firebug-css.png

Check out existing stylesheets and change them in real time

firebug-script.png

Make sure the right scripts are loading, and there aren't any JS errors.

firebug-dom.png

Check the DOM to make sure your customizations are working properly.

You can even use the Net tab to see how any Google Analytics code you have on the page is affecting your load times. For those of you who need to use the same functionality in Internet Explorer or another browser, don't fret! There's always Firebug Lite, a bookmarklet that lets you use Firebug in other browsers (although it's a little slower).

#3. Firecookie (and Cookie Viewers in general)

fire-cookie-small.jpg Continuing the tradition of tools that are on fire, Firecookie comes in as the next entry on our list, although really you could substitute it with any decent cookie viewer. Firecookie (and its cousins) allow you to view, add, delete, and change all cookies (specifically Google Analytics and Google Website Optimizer cookies) for the domain of the page you are viewing.

The Google Analytics cookies are named: __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, __utmv
The Google Website Optimizer cookies are named: __utmx, __utmxx

firecookie.jpg

Firecookie in action on the ROI Revolution home page.


Again, any reasonable cookie viewer will do the job, and there are plenty available for other browsers.

#4/5. Live HTTP Headers (HTTP Watch Basic for IE)

flaming-header.jpg This tool may seem a little less obvious to you if you haven't done a lot of work with troubleshooting Google Analytics, but really it's the most important tool out there for making sure ecommerce, event tracking, custom pageviews, and even the basic Google Analytics code are working properly. Simply set up the tool to look for requests to the _utm.gif, and you're well on your way to seeing all of the data that's being sent off to Google Analytics.

live-http-config.jpg

Step 1: Configure the tool to look for Google Analytics 'hits'.

live-http-hit.jpg

An example 'hit' the the Google Analytics servers. This means the page is being tracked.

Just like Firecookie, there are lots of substitutes available for both Firefox and other browsers, but one I would like to mention is for Internet Explorer, and is called HTTP Watch Basic. This tool does a very good job of showing you how information is being sent to Google Analytics:

http-watch-basic.png

An example 'hit' to the Google Analytics servers in HTTP Watch Basic.


#6. WASP (Web Analytics Solution Profiler)

wasp-flower.jpg

I never thought I'd need to make so many things look like they're on fire in Photoshop.


WASP is a handy little took that allows you to get information about not just Google Analytics, but a host of other analytics solutions that may be running on a given site. You can use it to troubleshoot your own installation, or to see what kind of tools your competitors are using to measure their traffic. A free version is available, and it is all you'll need in most situations. If you do need a more powerful version, there are plenty of paid packages you can buy. It's a great tool if you're troubleshooting analytics installations often:
wasp-sidebar.png

The WASP sidebar in action.


wasp-status.png

The WASP statusbar.

I'm sure I've left some other great tools off this list, so if you know of some that I've forgotten, please let us know about them by leaving a comment!

Google Analytics for Online Advertisers
Here at ROI Revolution, we consider Google Analytics tracking essential for paid search, so it's included in our PPC Campaign Management service.

Comments

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

Patrick said:

Great post and I agree that these are some essential tools. Another fine plugin for Firefox would be Ghostery.com, which alerts you about the web bugs, ad networks and widgets on every page on the web.

Really useful to use this little add-on next to the ones mentioned above.

April 17, 2009 3:29 PM

Glen Barnes said:

You might also want to check out Charles - http://getcharles.com which is a standalone app for monitoring the web traffic. It is more powerful than httpdeaders and will work with any http traffic (FF,IE, Opera, widgets,etc) It is a very useful app.

April 17, 2009 3:30 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Patrick:

Thanks for mentioning Ghostery, it is a great addition to the toolset! I think once I get a more comprehensive list of tools, I'll update this post to be a little more comprehensive. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:46 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Glen:

I'll check it out for sure - there are a bunch of tools out there that do this kind of thing, and I think it's great to investigate them all. Anything that can work across multiple browsers brings some serious value to the table. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 3:48 PM

S.Hamel said:

Thanks for the WASP mention. Beyond being handy for quick spot checks with the statusbar or detailed analysis with the sidebar, did you know WASP also has a crawler that will scan your site and bring back info about the tags on each pages (or lack of it!)

Cheers,
St\xE9phane

April 17, 2009 4:37 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Stephane:

Thanks for pointing out the added functionality of your tool for those who may not know that it is also a crawler. The last thing I want to do is sell the tool short - I think it's great for both Google Analytics and the Web Analytics community as a whole. Thanks!

April 17, 2009 4:41 PM

V Lonsdale said:

Great post! You may also find http://www.sitescanga.com of use for checking all your pages GA script tags are in place correctly. :-) But if you have (like me) customised bits here and there for a numer of websites. Expect to see some interesting reports.

May 6, 2009 1:46 PM

mik said:

thanks for the tips here :) i would like to attend the seminar in miami, unfortunatly i cant make it..please record the seminar to your mp3 recorder if you can ;)

June 2, 2009 10:59 AM

Jitendra said:

Great way to present content with related pics.....

August 31, 2009 7:30 AM

The trouble shooter said:

This fundamental step of getting the data in using page tags, is the key to everything else i.e. getting good, solid, accurate data in*. There simply is no point investing in analysis if the data is flawed. After all, garbage in = garbage out. And of course the web is ever changing, so maintaining data integrity is also key. Page tagging is therefore not a one time, "set it and forget it" process.

February 5, 2010 1:27 AM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@The trouble shooter:

I couldn't agree more.

February 5, 2010 8:07 AM

Josh Fialkoff said:

Hi,

I am having trouble solving a problem:

I have a site that was generating data well for months.

One day (on a Saturday) last week, it stopped.

But the Google Analytics dashboard says it is successfully receiving data.

I have confirmed that the script has the right account number and it is installed correctly on all pages.

Are there any other potential trouble spots?

Are there any tools that can help further diagnose the problem?

Thanks,
Josh

February 22, 2010 3:18 PM

Shawn Purtell, Senior Web Analytics Engineer Author Profile Page said:

@Josh:

If you've triple-checked the code on the site and all looks good, there are a couple things you could also check that may still be affecting Google Analytics. First, make sure there are no other Javascript errors on the page - you can use Firebug or the Error Console that's built into Firefox to do that.

Second, you'll want to check if the Google Analytics cookies are being created properly. The Google Analytics cookies are named __utma, __utmb, __utmc, __utmz, and __utmv. Clear your cookies and reload the page to make sure they are being created (you may not see __utmv if you don't have any custom variables).

Finally, use Live HTTP headers to see whether or not the information is being properly sent to Google Analytics.

Hope this helps!

February 23, 2010 8:21 AM

JonCryer said:

Hi,
Fantastic post.
I really admire this kind of information.Thanks for tips and advice.

Thanks :)

March 14, 2011 2:30 AM

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