The ROI Revolution Blog

Say Goodbye to Expensive Analytics

May 19, 2006

istock_000000289638smaller.jpgIntuit's Avinash Kaushik started blogging earlier this week. The blog is called Occam's Razor after William of Ockham's famous principle: "Entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity."

Kaushik's blog has already proven to be a keenly written and enlightening read. In his latest post, Kaushik offers a few suggestions to those spending a boatload on web analytics:

  1. Apply for a free Google Analytics account at GA Sign Up Page
  2. Once you get the code implement Google Analytics on your website in parallel with your favorite expensive analytics tool
  3. Get a comfort level for delta between the two sets of key numbers (you know visitors, conversions, page views etc etc) and create a multiplier (my tool shows visitors 10% higher and page views 10% lower than Google). You will use this multiplier in future to compare year over year trends if you want to.
  4. Cancel the contract with your favorite expensive analytics vendor and take that $50k or $100k or $200k and: 1) Hire a smart analyst for between $50k to whatever maybe your areas great salary 2) Put the rest of the money in your pocket.

Makes a lot of sense when put that way, doesn't it? You can save a lot of money, just by switching to a free utility like Google Analytics. As Kaushik says, "Your smart analyst will be able to extract just as much value from GA than your old tool, in fact my prediction is that it will be a lot more."

So, basically, don't multiple your entities--in this case, your web analytics spend--beyond necessity. Turns out William of Ockham knew a thing or two about web analytics.

Hat tip to Andy Beal

Google Analytics for Online Advertisers
Here at ROI Revolution, we consider Google Analytics tracking essential for paid search, so it's included in our PPC Campaign Management service.

Comments

Lisa Solomon said:

It's all well and good to sign up for a GA account: the problem is that the wait to actually be activiate is interminable. I requested a GA account at least 6 months ago and still have no clue when they'll get around to me.

May 19, 2006 7:55 PM

Joel said:

Great post guys and thanks for the pointer to Avinash's blog, you are right it is a great read. He makes a compelling case for investment in brainpower but in your post you missed point #5 and #6 in the list (I read that on his blog):

5 Your smart analyst will be able to extract just as much value from GA than your old tool, in fact my prediction is that it will be a lot more.

6 As the level of savvy in your org grows, as the level of sophistication of supporting processes increased, perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool and then be ready to extract a corresponding amount of value from it.

Thanks again for sharing the post.

May 20, 2006 12:40 AM

Michael Harrison said:

Lisa:
I know you've probably heard this spiel before, but bear with it. Google is working very hard to clear out the queue. It's a very high priority. And when you get your invitation code, it will be well worth the wait.

May 22, 2006 1:29 PM

Michael Harrison said:

Joel:
Thanks for the comment. I think the key word in Kaushik's sixth point is "perhaps." As in, "...perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool..." One of the best points of his article is that the tool itself is not a silver bullet. You need good analysis to get your money's worth. You're going to need a pretty hefty return for that $200k Omniture subscription to actually pay for itself. Finding a good analyst is the key. Kaushik suggests hiring one, and we tend to agree.

May 22, 2006 1:30 PM

Brad Henry said:

I absolutly agree with Google's approach to providing the GA for free. It really help to establish Google as a brand for the people. Obviously, their main focus is revenue but by providing this and other services for free, they are gaining millions of people's loyalty. Great Strategy!

Thanks,
Brad

October 16, 2006 1:51 PM

Lisa Solomon said:

It's all well and good to sign up for a GA account: the problem is that the wait to actually be activiate is interminable. I requested a GA account at least 6 months ago and still have no clue when they'll get around to me.

May 19, 2006 7:55 PM

Joel said:

Great post guys and thanks for the pointer to Avinash's blog, you are right it is a great read. He makes a compelling case for investment in brainpower but in your post you missed point #5 and #6 in the list (I read that on his blog):

5 Your smart analyst will be able to extract just as much value from GA than your old tool, in fact my prediction is that it will be a lot more.

6 As the level of savvy in your org grows, as the level of sophistication of supporting processes increased, perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool and then be ready to extract a corresponding amount of value from it.

Thanks again for sharing the post.

May 20, 2006 12:40 AM

Michael Harrison said:

Lisa:
I know you've probably heard this spiel before, but bear with it. Google is working very hard to clear out the queue. It's a very high priority. And when you get your invitation code, it will be well worth the wait.

May 22, 2006 1:29 PM

Michael Harrison said:

Joel:
Thanks for the comment. I think the key word in Kaushik's sixth point is "perhaps." As in, "...perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool..." One of the best points of his article is that the tool itself is not a silver bullet. You need good analysis to get your money's worth. You're going to need a pretty hefty return for that $200k Omniture subscription to actually pay for itself. Finding a good analyst is the key. Kaushik suggests hiring one, and we tend to agree.

May 22, 2006 1:30 PM

Brad Henry said:

I absolutly agree with Google's approach to providing the GA for free. It really help to establish Google as a brand for the people. Obviously, their main focus is revenue but by providing this and other services for free, they are gaining millions of people's loyalty. Great Strategy!

Thanks,
Brad

October 16, 2006 1:51 PM

Lisa Solomon said:

It's all well and good to sign up for a GA account: the problem is that the wait to actually be activiate is interminable. I requested a GA account at least 6 months ago and still have no clue when they'll get around to me.

May 19, 2006 7:55 PM

Joel said:

Great post guys and thanks for the pointer to Avinash's blog, you are right it is a great read. He makes a compelling case for investment in brainpower but in your post you missed point #5 and #6 in the list (I read that on his blog):

5 Your smart analyst will be able to extract just as much value from GA than your old tool, in fact my prediction is that it will be a lot more.

6 As the level of savvy in your org grows, as the level of sophistication of supporting processes increased, perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool and then be ready to extract a corresponding amount of value from it.

Thanks again for sharing the post.

May 20, 2006 12:40 AM

Michael Harrison said:

Lisa:
I know you've probably heard this spiel before, but bear with it. Google is working very hard to clear out the queue. It's a very high priority. And when you get your invitation code, it will be well worth the wait.

May 22, 2006 1:29 PM

Michael Harrison said:

Joel:
Thanks for the comment. I think the key word in Kaushik's sixth point is "perhaps." As in, "...perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool..." One of the best points of his article is that the tool itself is not a silver bullet. You need good analysis to get your money's worth. You're going to need a pretty hefty return for that $200k Omniture subscription to actually pay for itself. Finding a good analyst is the key. Kaushik suggests hiring one, and we tend to agree.

May 22, 2006 1:30 PM

Brad Henry said:

I absolutly agree with Google's approach to providing the GA for free. It really help to establish Google as a brand for the people. Obviously, their main focus is revenue but by providing this and other services for free, they are gaining millions of people's loyalty. Great Strategy!

Thanks,
Brad

October 16, 2006 1:51 PM

Lisa Solomon said:

It's all well and good to sign up for a GA account: the problem is that the wait to actually be activiate is interminable. I requested a GA account at least 6 months ago and still have no clue when they'll get around to me.

May 19, 2006 7:55 PM

Joel said:

Great post guys and thanks for the pointer to Avinash's blog, you are right it is a great read. He makes a compelling case for investment in brainpower but in your post you missed point #5 and #6 in the list (I read that on his blog):

5 Your smart analyst will be able to extract just as much value from GA than your old tool, in fact my prediction is that it will be a lot more.

6 As the level of savvy in your org grows, as the level of sophistication of supporting processes increased, perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool and then be ready to extract a corresponding amount of value from it.

Thanks again for sharing the post.

May 20, 2006 12:40 AM

Michael Harrison said:

Lisa:
I know you've probably heard this spiel before, but bear with it. Google is working very hard to clear out the queue. It's a very high priority. And when you get your invitation code, it will be well worth the wait.

May 22, 2006 1:29 PM

Michael Harrison said:

Joel:
Thanks for the comment. I think the key word in Kaushik's sixth point is "perhaps." As in, "...perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool..." One of the best points of his article is that the tool itself is not a silver bullet. You need good analysis to get your money's worth. You're going to need a pretty hefty return for that $200k Omniture subscription to actually pay for itself. Finding a good analyst is the key. Kaushik suggests hiring one, and we tend to agree.

May 22, 2006 1:30 PM

Brad Henry said:

I absolutly agree with Google's approach to providing the GA for free. It really help to establish Google as a brand for the people. Obviously, their main focus is revenue but by providing this and other services for free, they are gaining millions of people's loyalty. Great Strategy!

Thanks,
Brad

October 16, 2006 1:51 PM

Lisa Solomon said:

It's all well and good to sign up for a GA account: the problem is that the wait to actually be activiate is interminable. I requested a GA account at least 6 months ago and still have no clue when they'll get around to me.

May 19, 2006 7:55 PM

Joel said:

Great post guys and thanks for the pointer to Avinash's blog, you are right it is a great read. He makes a compelling case for investment in brainpower but in your post you missed point #5 and #6 in the list (I read that on his blog):

5 Your smart analyst will be able to extract just as much value from GA than your old tool, in fact my prediction is that it will be a lot more.

6 As the level of savvy in your org grows, as the level of sophistication of supporting processes increased, perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool and then be ready to extract a corresponding amount of value from it.

Thanks again for sharing the post.

May 20, 2006 12:40 AM

Michael Harrison said:

Lisa:
I know you've probably heard this spiel before, but bear with it. Google is working very hard to clear out the queue. It's a very high priority. And when you get your invitation code, it will be well worth the wait.

May 22, 2006 1:29 PM

Michael Harrison said:

Joel:
Thanks for the comment. I think the key word in Kaushik's sixth point is "perhaps." As in, "...perhaps in two years you might be ready to plunk down $200k on a web analytics tool..." One of the best points of his article is that the tool itself is not a silver bullet. You need good analysis to get your money's worth. You're going to need a pretty hefty return for that $200k Omniture subscription to actually pay for itself. Finding a good analyst is the key. Kaushik suggests hiring one, and we tend to agree.

May 22, 2006 1:30 PM

Brad Henry said:

I absolutly agree with Google's approach to providing the GA for free. It really help to establish Google as a brand for the people. Obviously, their main focus is revenue but by providing this and other services for free, they are gaining millions of people's loyalty. Great Strategy!

Thanks,
Brad

October 16, 2006 1:51 PM

Post Your Comments

© 2002-2014 ROI Revolution, Inc. All rights reserved.